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4 edition of effects of agricultural irrigation on wetland ecosystems in developing countries found in the catalog.

effects of agricultural irrigation on wetland ecosystems in developing countries

Hector Galbraith

effects of agricultural irrigation on wetland ecosystems in developing countries

a literature review

by Hector Galbraith

  • 318 Want to read
  • 11 Currently reading

Published by International Water Management Institute in Colombo .
Written in English


Edition Notes

StatementHector Galbraith, Priyanie Amerasinghe, and Annette Huber-Lee.
SeriesCA discussion paper -- 1
ContributionsAmerasinghe, Priyanie., Huber-Lee, Annette., International Water Management Institute., Stockholm Environment Institute., Comprehensive Assessment of Water Management in Agriculture (Program)
The Physical Object
Paginationv, 23 p. ;
Number of Pages23
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL16670797M
ISBN 109290905964
LC Control Number2006414672

Environmental degradation is the deterioration of the environment through depletion of resources such as quality of air, water and soil; the destruction of ecosystems; habitat destruction; the extinction of wildlife; and is defined as any change or disturbance to the environment perceived to be deleterious or undesirable. Environmental degradation is one of the ten threats.


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effects of agricultural irrigation on wetland ecosystems in developing countries by Hector Galbraith Download PDF EPUB FB2

Galbraith, H. ; Amerasinghe, P. ; Huber-Lee, A. The effects of agricultural irrigation on wetland ecosystems in developing countries: A literature review. CA Discussion Paper 1 Colombo, Sri Lanka: Comprehensive Assessment Secretariat.

irrigation effects irrgated farming wetlands ecosystems developing countries ISBN THE EFFECTS OF IRRIGATION ON WETLAND ECOSYSTEMS IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES A LITERATURE REVIEW 29 August Hector Galbraith, PhD. Galbraith Environmental Sciences and University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado Annette Huber-Lee, PhD.Stockholm Environment Institute - Boston, Massachusetts.

The Effects of Irrigation on Wetland Ecosystems in Developing Countries: A Literature Review. Annette Huber-Lee, H. Galbraith. This report reviews the scientific and gray literature to evaluate the extent to which irrigation has been shown to affect wetland ecosystems in developing countries. the sustainability of wetland ecosystems becomes intertwined with the sustain-ability of agro-ecosystems.

Natural wetlands, at the interface of upland or floodplain agriculture, have served as the interface and buffer between agriculture and other ecosystems. However, many natural wetlands are at or beyond their carrying capacity. Increasing agricultural land use intensity is one of the major land useland cover (LULC) changes in wetland ecosystems.

LULC changes have major impacts on the environment, livelihoods and nature. Wetlands used for agriculture can be: Wetland ecosystems which have been converted to some degree but maintain a modified range of eco-system services that support agri-cultural production.

Examples include dambos, bas fonds, inland valleys and other similar small seasonal wetlands in Africa; oodplains in which. Notably, wetlands effects of agricultural irrigation on wetland ecosystems in developing countries book be and have been successfully implemented in developed and developing countries, so facilitating technology transfer across geographic, social and economic boundaries.

The development of wetland technology began in the late s, with a new surge of applications and research since the start of the 21st century. The growth of th e emissions fr om electricit y and heat is the highest between.

andwhich increased by around 45 percent. Developing countries, particularly China, India, and other. Abstract. Agricultural system serves as an important source of provisioning, regulating, supporting and cultural ecosystem services. However, increased occurrence of drought has reduced ecosystem services provided by agriculture.

Climate change is also projected to reduce essential ecosystem services, especially in developing countries. productive ecosystems providing goods and services for people. Negative effects of "development" on wetlands are exemplified through adverse climatic effects (Aral Sea, USSR), inadvertent environmental changes (Canadian Prairie Potholes), non-sustai­ nable alternative uses (South Chad Irrigation.

Intensive subsistence agriculture is widespread in many less developed countries where over 80 of their rural population is engaged in this type of farming.

Intensive subsistence agriculture contributes substantially to economies of these countries and in alleviating food insecurity. Wetlands serve as valuable natural infrastructure for agriculture, providing reliable water and fertile soils, but they are at risk from agricultures growing demands for land and water.

They are increasingly threatened by population growth, large-scale development initiatives intended to alleviate poverty, and the possible impacts of climate change. Given the low awareness levels and economic constraints, the situation will not be different in developing countries.

Galbraith et al. [9] provided an in-depth review of the literature on the effects of agricultural irrigation on wetland ecosystems. In some developing countries, untreated or partially treated sewage is used for irrigation.

The designation of flood plains may also be a useful measure that allows groundwater recharge and reduces peak discharges downstream.

This is one of the positive functions of many areas of wetland. It is important that new irrigation infrastructure does not adversely effect the natural drainage pattern, thus causing localized flooding.

Increasing agricultural land use intensity is one of the major land useland cover (LULC) changes in wetland ecosystems. LULC changes have major impacts on the environment, livelihoods and nature conservation.

In this study, we evaluate the impacts of investments in small-scale irrigation schemes on LULC in relation to regional development in Kilombero Valley, Tanzania. This research study investigates the effects of wetland degradation on the socio economic welfare. In Uganda, wetland degradation has been going since s on a small scale; it was not until in the s that wetlands become a subject of large.

Ecosystem services provided by wetlands on agricultural landscapes include fish and wildlife habitat support, mitigation of pollution effects, water conservation, and climate change mitigation. Riparian buffer practices are also considered in this synthesis due to their implementation in wetlands or effects on wetland ecosystem service.

A part of the project Avoidance of maladaptation through climate smart agriculture and restoration of Lang Sen wetlands in Vietnam CSA models will be introduced to reduce the use of agrochemicals and grow high-priced farm products in order to achieve positive income effects while reducing impacts to the surrounding environment.

In large part of European agricultural floodplains, where river courses are heavily regulated and exploited for irrigation, newly formed wetland ecosystem are becoming more and more rare.

Existing wetlands undergo aging, rapid infilling, and surface reduction, which are enhanced by multiple anthropogenic pressures and changing climate (Tockner.

Wetland degradation and loss has persisted in developing countries due to existence of poor institutional frameworks supporting wetland governance.

Therefore, wetland ecosystem services that support the livelihoods of most subsistence populations in rural areas are concomitantly lost. effects of faecal pollution vary. In developing countries intestinal disease is the main problem, while organic load and eutrophication may be of greater concern in developed countries (in the rivers into which the sewage or effluent is discharged and in the sea into.

Agriculture accounts for 70 of total global freshwater withdrawals, which is as high as 90 in many regions of the developing world, making the agricultural sector the largest water consumer (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), ) (Figure 1).

Irrigation is of crucial importance to global food security. Functions of wetlands often have effects beyond the wetland boundary. For example, wetlands store surface water, and the effect of this function downstream is a reduction in flood peak.

Indicators often correspond to specific functions (Table ), which can vary with wetland class, physiographic region, and degree of disturbance. Safe and sustainable business models for water reuse in aquaculture in developing countries.

Colombo, Sri Lanka: International Water Management Institute (IWMI). CGIAR Research Program on Water, Land and Ecosystems (WLE) 46p.

(Resource Recovery and Reuse Series 20) Keywords Abstract | Fulltext ( MB). agriculture in Niamey, Niger 35 Another example is treated wastewater reuse for irrigation,36 a treatment system (Appendix 7) consisting of a waste stabilization pond (WSP) and a constructed wetland (CW) system connected to it.

This case showed that with the. Constructed wetlands (CWs) can help mitigate the effects of agricultural non-point sources of pollution and remove different pollutants from tile drainage water.

In this study, hydrological and water quality data of a Northern Italian CW that has been treating agricultural drainage water since were considered to assess its ability to.

The World Economic Forum is an independent international organization committed to improving the state of the world by engaging business, political, academic and other leaders of society to shape global, regional and industry agendas.

Incorporated as a not-for-profit foundation inand headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland, the Forum is tied to no political, partisan or national interests. Intensification is essential to developing sustainable agricultural systems in the humid tropics and elsewhere, but it can have various meanings in different contexts.

Intensification in sustainable agricultural systems generally refers to the fuller use of land, water, and biotic resources to enhance the agronomic performance of agroecosystems. 3 Department of Soil and Environmental Sciences, Muhammad Nawaz Shareef, University of Agriculture Multan, Pakistan.

Pakistan is one of the most climate susceptible countries in the world. Climate change has become global issue for crops due to increase in temperature, less rainfall resulting in shortage of water and decrease in crop yield.

On the global level. As agriculture changes, developing countries are grappling with how to provide meaningful employment and entrepreneurial opportunities to youth and others.

More than 85 of the worlds billion youth live in developing countries, and the once dominant agricultural sector is shrinking. Kinetics of Heavy Metals Adsorption on Gravels Derived From Subsurface Flow Constructed Wetland: ch Adsorption kinetics of Ni, Cr, and Pb on gravels collected from constructed wetland was studied at varied metal concentrations and contact period for.

Wetlands are diverse, productive ecosystems of ecological and economic value. Their protection in a changing world requires an understanding of their unique ecology. A wide array of on-farm agricultural management technologies and practices are available or development that could increase yields and decrease pollution and water use; for example reducing yield gaps (not as high in Asia as in Africa), reducing subsidies, change land use and crop types, improving irrigation efficiency, diversified and.

Food security in developing countries depends in part on the sustainable use of natural resources. Food security is usually examined through three dimensions, namely the availability, access, and utilization of food.

Ecosystems directly and indirectly support each of these dimensions through the provision of critical ecosystem services that facilitate agricultural production, create income. With both direct effects on crop production and indirect effects through changes in irrigation, water availability and potential evapotranspiration, the effects of disasters and climate change on Vietnams agriculture could result in a reduction of total gross domestic product (GDP) by.

The environmental effects of irrigation relate to the changes in quantity and quality of soil and water as a result of irrigation and the subsequent effects on natural and social conditions in river basins and downstream of an irrigation effects stem from the altered hydrological conditions caused by the installation and operation of the irrigation scheme.

The Role of Policy in Water Management. The theory of exhaustible resources, such as groundwater, is an important aspect of economics that addresses the difficulties in establishing property rights for shared resources. Groundwater is a common pool resource accessed by several different parties, so extractions by one user automatically reduce.

A number of forces continue to seriously affect our natural water resources. Many of these are primarily the result of human actions and include ecosystem and landscape changes, sedimentation, pollution, over-abstraction and climate change.

The removal, destruction or impairment of natural ecosystems are among the greatest causes of critical impacts on the sustainability of our natural water. Book Description. Winner of an Outstanding Academic Title Award from CHOICE Magazine.

Encyclopedia of Environmental Management gives a comprehensive overview of environmental problems, their sources, their assessment, and their h in-depth entries and a topical table of contents, readers will quickly find answers to questions about specific pollution.

Climate change is likely to have adverse effects on the agriculture sector in Jamaica. Increase in the intensity and frequency of climate-related natural hazards, escalating rainfall variability, droughts and floods combined with fragile ecosystems and coastal zones, and agriculture-dependent livelihoods all contribute to Jamaica's overall vulnerability to climate change.

Urban expansion and industrial development destroy agricultural lands, pastures, and forests, and reduce the ecological and biological potential of lands, known as desertification.

Diminished land potential due to one or a combination of processes such as erosion, destruction of water resources, destruction of vegetation, and swamping, by climate and human factors, is called desertification.Resource depletion is the consumption of a resource faster than it can be l resources are commonly divided between renewable resources and non-renewable resources (see also mineral resource classification).Use of either of these forms of resources beyond their rate of replacement is considered to be resource depletion.

The value of a resource is a direct result of its. Changes include stream channelization, wetland draining, forest and palouse prairie conversion for agricultural use, high road density, elimination of old growth timber stands, and denuding riparian communities.

The significance of these changes is manifested in the degradation of habitats supporting native flora and fauna.